Document Type: Special Articles

Authors

1 Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

2 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

Abstract

Background: The aim of this preliminary study was to assess the safety and efficacy of high-dose oral vitamin D3 supplementation during pregnancy in women with multiple sclerosis (MS) in Isfahan, Iran.Methods:In a single center open-label randomized, controlled clinical Phase I/II pilot study, 15 pregnant women with confirmed MS with low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels were randomly allocated to receive either 50,000 IU/week vitamin D3 or routine care from 12 to 16 weeks of gestation till delivery. The main outcome measures were mean change in serum 25(OH)D levels, expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score, and number of relapse events during pregnancy and within 6 months after delivery.Results: Average serum 25(OH)D level at the end of trial in vitamin D3 supplemented group was higher than routine care group (33.7 ng/mL vs. 14.6 ng/ml, P < 0.050). In vitamin D3 group, the mean EDSS did not changed 6 months after delivery (P > 0.050), whereas in routine care group, the mean EDSS increased from 1.3 (0.4) to 1.7 (0.6) (P < 0.070). Women in vitamin D3 group appeared to have fewer relapse events during pregnancy and within 6 months after delivery. No significant adverse events occurred.Conclusion:Adding high dose vitamin D3 supplementation during pregnancy to routine care of women with MS had significant effect on the serum 25(OH)D levels, EDSS and number of relapse events during pregnancy and within 6 months after delivery.