Document Type: Special Articles

Authors

1 Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences AND Iranian Center of Neurological Research (ICNR), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

2 Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Islamic Azad University, Tehran Medical Branch, Tehran, Iran.

3 Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine AND Center for Research on Occupational Diseases, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

Background: Scuba divers work in high pressure conditions which may cause some changes in physiological status to adapt to this situation. In this study, the carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) was assessed in divers as a risk factor of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disorders.Methods: This historical cohort study was performed on 16 male professional scuba divers as case group and 30 healthy people as controls with age range of 26-66 years. CIMT of both carotids of supine participants was measured by a 10 MHz linear ultrasonic probe quantitatively. Relationship between experience of diving and carotid IMT was evaluated.Results: All the participants were males (mean age 42.9 ± 10.58. and for the control group was (47.05 ± 12.31 years). The mean right CIMT in divers and control group was 524.31 ± 149.40 and 443.66 ± 59.62 micrometer, respectively. Furthermore, the mean left CIMT in divers and control group was 624.57 ± 116.15 and 458.44 ± 49.56 micrometer, respectively. Conclusion: The findings demonstrated that long-term occupational diving leads to increased intima-media thickness in scuba divers.