Document Type: Short Communication

Authors

1 Department of Radiology, Afzalipour School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran Neurology Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

2 Neurology Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

3 Department of Community Medicine, School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

4 Department of Radiology, Afzalipour School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

Abstract

Background: Several studies indicate contribution of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in multiple sclerosis (MS) disease. This study was designed to determine whether there is an effective difference in pituitary height, shape, and anterior-posterior diameter (APD) between patients with MS and the control group.Methods: In this study, sagittal pituitary height and APD of 134 men and women (64 patients with MS and 70 healthy subjects as control group) were measured by T1 sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All the subjects were free of sellar or parasellar pathology without a history of surgical intervention or prolactin affecting drugs like bromocriptine and cabergoline or corticosteroid consumption.Results: Mean height of pituitary gland was 6.62 ± 1.43 and 5.78 ± 1.15 mm for patients and the control group, respectively, and the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.001). Mean APD was 10.40 ± 1.29 mm for the group of patients and 10.25 ± 1.41 mm for the control group, respectively, without significant differences. 46.9%, 37.5%, and 15.6% of patients had flat, convex, and concave hypophyseal surfaces, respectively. This rate was 50%, 30%, and 20% among the control group, respectively. There was no significant difference between our measurements among patients on whom imaging study was performed at time of disease onset with others.Conclusion: Mean height of pituitary gland among patients with MS was significantly greater than the control group (P = 0.001). So can we consider the same etiology for pituitary hypertrophy among patients with MS as a hypothesis?